February 9, 2017

On Writer's Block



Since beginning a schedule on laynejoy, I've been giving writing tips paralleling my process working through my first novel. Right now, I'm encountering potentially the most dreadful process, writer's block. 

Today, I've decided to sit down and talk through some of my tips that I've been using to get out of this gray area, whether it be in a general sense of writing, or currently in the midst of a plot or other writing project.

1. Reading Similar Literature
I'm currently working on a Teen Romance novel, and I've been indulging in biographies and Teen Fiction when it comes to my recreational reading. Although this causes several different ideas for different plots, it isn't going to help me find any ideas for the novel that I'm working on because they are not in the same genre. Only last trip to the library, I picked up a novel by Jennifer E. Smith, one of my favorite Teen Romance authors, and I've been rekindling my love for the Romantic genre. It's given me some inspiration, and I found myself working back on my novel last night.

2. Write Poetry
I will always believe poetry is vital to all writers: whether you write fiction, non-fiction, or journalism. There doesn't need to be structure to poetry. You can sit down and free-write and get the smallest feelings out, and it gets the gears turning, and your feelings begin to flow. If you decide to add any poetic structure, it definitely adds the challenge, and may be beneficial to the thought process going into your writing.

3. Edit, edit, edit
Sometimes I find it difficult to pick up my piece and just begin writing again because my best writing comes from when I'm engulfed in a scene or a moment. Therefore, going back and editing can remind you where you're at, where the tension is at, what's going to happen next, and get the momentum moving again. Also, you don't need to write in order. For example, when I wrote the last scene I was working on, I wrote the climax of the scene first, and then filled in how the characters got to the setting, and the rising action within the scene, and I get more writing done this way.

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